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Last reading for this month! And yeah, Gah, I'm slow yet again getting something up for next month. Anyone have any suggestions, or should it be a skip month again? How busy are people this coming month?

The chapter title is apparently (at least, I think) a slight jab at the sensibilities of the Victorians where in a racy sort of thing they might have a horrible expression like "bloody," or some such, but would replace any mention of "God" with a dash, because, well.

Not, come to think of it, that we can really poke much fun at the Victorians on this, since I remember not too long ago when things would be lightly censored on TV, such as on David Letterman's show, and "damn" could get by, but they'd bleep out the "God" if that came before it. Don't know if that still happens or not, since I haven't watched something with that sort of censoring for a while. Hmm.

Anyhow, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star is, I think, forever twisted in my mind now after enough exposure to the various forms of Alice in Wonderland, since even knowing that "diamond" is correct, my brain wants to say "tea tray."

Hah, and a quick nod to Oliver Twist in the midst of everything else, with the Artful Dodger apparently having grown older and taken the place of Fagin. Actually, now I can't remember what happened to him (if anything) in the actual book, since I was familiar with the musical version long before I ever read the Dickens work. I should probably dig that up and read it again soon. I know that the fates of some characters at least were darker, not that the fates of others needed darkening any further.

And in fact, what with all the names tossed out and the care Moore takes to point out how they're going underground and all, it almost seems like there's maybe some OTHER work that used the Artful Dodger and a band, under London or some such. But if there is, I don't see a reference to it on Dodger's wiki page. I think maybe my brain is just getting a bit too ready to see allusions now.

War kites. Yeesh. Although at least it's an interesting way to have some aerial warfare in an era that was juuust before actual manned flight. Well, I mean, they had it with hot air balloons, but that's more "bobbing" or "drifting" than "flying." (Although to be fair, if we're being technical kites are more like "gliding" as well.)

Glad to see that someone else is pointing out what came to my mind when I realized they had a hot air balloon - that's not exactly a sturdy vehicle for aerial ship-to-ship combat. But they're just using it to stealthily creep up and board the thing, which is better. Although it makes me surprised they didn't bring any extra cannon fodder from Nemo's crew, since they know they're going to be outnumbered and in a crunch. Then again, they could have been worried about the weight, since even Hyde's extra weight later is enough to send the thing crashing.

And yay, there's finally some reference of the discrepancy between Hyde in this series, and the one in the original books. It's not actually explained, but acknowledged. Apparently he has been changing/growing since the events of the book.

I've got to wonder WHY Hyde is being reasonable and nicer to Mina, given that he makes it clear in the previous adventure that he doesn't like her much, and he tried to rape and murder her when they "recruited" him. And as a side note, I do like the small background element of the invisible man smoking a cigarette, and blowing a smoke ring, when we can't see him. (Although it might have been even better if we saw, say, the smoke swirling around inside his mouth as he inhaled as well.)

Machine harpoon guns now. Oookay. And yeah, we see again that Hyde's such a charmer.

And wtf? "smelly little Lesbian"? Where the hell does he get that from? I wonder if there's supposed to be more in Mina's backstory (between the events of Dracula and now) that Moriarty is aware of but we aren't. Or if it's just another slur for the hell of it. (And I'm surprised that someone of Moriarty's age, at that time, would use "lesbian" in the first place instead of, say, "Sapphist" or something.)

Ouch, man, that just can't work out well for Moriarty, eh?

And Mina wants to be held by Quatermain. Enh, I get tired of the whole "they hate each other, so obviously they're going to be IN LOVE" thing. We've seen nothing to indicate that Mina thinks of Quatermain yet as any more than a drug-addled sot. I guess we just don't have much room for proper development of a romance, but why include it at all then? Enh.

The League is making a habit of having to be fished out of the Thames, eh?

Eesh, I didn't even notice/think about this on my first read-through that I did before going through again for the writeup but... I wonder just how Griffin got his clothes he's wearing THIS time. Did he just murder one of the British Intelligence?

And now we DO get Mycroft Holmes as the mysterious "M" in charge of Intelligence, but only after Moriarty. And I like the noncommittal "mmm" when Mina mentions the "tragic loss" of his brother.

And yeah, in intelligence it can be useful to know of some of the snakes/moles in your organization and leave them there, with care, but I can't see how it'd be as useful if they know that you know they're untrustworthy. You know?

And dangit. An obvious hook at the end for the next volume... which I have to assume might also cover a few things such as "what did happen exactly with Mina and Jonathon?" and what the significance is of Hyde being able to see Griffin.

Anyhow. That was an interesting read, although a bit annoying at times with the weird character shifts from the originals (I'm looking at you Mina), and they seem to have an awful lot of fun throwing around all the negative aspects of the period, as a sort of refuge in audacity. "But, but, we're just reflecting how people would actually refer to other people or view them at the time!"


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Feb. 28th, 2012 12:52 am (UTC)
I think Jimmy intended it as a slur. The word was coined well before the time the story is set in (my dictionary puts it circa 1890, and other references claim 1870). I think Moriarty's the kind of jerk who automatically assumes that any woman who doesn't conform is a lesbian. Moriarty definitely failed his villainous alliteration roll there, though. The next time he shows up at a meeting of the Herostratus Club, he's going to be roundly mocked by his fellow villains.

Edited at 2012-02-28 12:53 am (UTC)
(Deleted comment)
Mar. 1st, 2012 11:55 pm (UTC)
Yeah, I was already thinking about that, and considering just putting up a "no bookies for March" thing. Especially since it's, y'know, already March.
( 3 Notes — Write a Footnote )