?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Page | Next Page

Yay, I remembered. :p


Ah, so they spend the first part of the issue making sure everyone knows who Moriarty is. Well, at least assuming they can figure out that this is Holmes and all. I liked this scene a good deal, since it meshes really well with what was actually in Doyle's books, even (as far as I can recall) faithfully reproducing the actual note Holmes left under his cigarette case for Watson. The main difference is, of course, that Moriarty lived (which Holmes wouldn't have had to have realized anyhow), and that he had two people there to back him up, not just Moran alone.

This is a good place to note what seemed to be a discrepancy earlier, that I had noted: Bond talked about "the great detective's death seven years ago," but he was only "dead" as far as Watson and the officials that worked with him were concerned for three years. But what I'd forgotten (and was pointed out earlier, either in the comments or in a link someone added, I forget which), Holmes didn't let Watson (well, the fiction goes) tell the world at large that he was alive for some years beyond that, so as far as the public was aware, he was "dead" for longer.

Anyhow, back to this issue. I'm really thinking the art doesn't always jell with Moore's intentions all the time, the more I see. Given that Moriarty's mumbling about how his injuries are just his ribs and legs, he thinks... while a couple panels before, he looks completely and utterly broken (especially his fingers).

It's a bit... sinister (well, more than a bit) that Moriarty's practically stating flat-out to Bond here that there's not really any difference between his "cover" as a crime lord and the real deal, anymore. Not that this is really surprising, given that he's about to run an air raid on half of his own capital city that he's supposed to be protecting and all.

I also like the touch of the Napoleon bust by the door on their way out. Not only is Moriarty the Napoleon of crime, as is mentioned in just a bit, but it also resonates with the later Holmes story "The Six Napoleons."

I was wondering why the invisible man would steal a uniform, since it's just... stupid, but I guess I can understand him being cold... but gah. As if we needed more hints that he's not really a nice guy. (Well, of course that gels with the actual story from which he came, but yeah.)

So it looks like Mina *is* supposed to be in charge officially, which wasn't made clear before. I'll just... be a wimp for the moment and not comment any further on those little conversations. -_- (Feel free though if you want!)

Hum, the label mentioning Dr. Samuel Ferguson appparently ties the package Nemo finds to the story "Five Weeks in a Balloon" which I also haven't read... I'm starting to feel downright illiterate. Anyhow... hot air balloon expedition, anyone?



One more issue to go!

Comments

( 1 Note — Write a Footnote )
khedron
Feb. 27th, 2012 03:49 am (UTC)
This is a good place to note what seemed to be a discrepancy earlier, that I had noted: Bond talked about "the great detective's death seven years ago," but he was only "dead" as far as Watson and the officials that worked with him were concerned for three years. But what I'd forgotten (and was pointed out earlier, either in the comments or in a link someone added, I forget which), Holmes didn't let Watson (well, the fiction goes) tell the world at large that he was alive for some years beyond that, so as far as the public was aware, he was "dead" for longer.

Ahh, interesting. I did not know any of that. I've read a lot of the stories, you know, I'm not sure I've ever read the Reichenbach Falls one. I know about it culturally, but I should go back & make sure.

Anyhow, back to this issue. I'm really thinking the art doesn't always jell with Moore's intentions all the time, the more I see. Given that Moriarty's mumbling about how his injuries are just his ribs and legs, he thinks... while a couple panels before, he looks completely and utterly broken (especially his fingers).

Early on, at least, I was troubled by the art in general. When they were infiltrating the Chinese hideout, I found myself debating whether or not the deformed drawings of Chinese faces were intentionally trying to convey a fear or otherness about how the Chinese may've been perceived c. 1900. Then I remembered, oh, right, people just look like that.

I was wondering why the invisible man would steal a uniform, since it's just... stupid, but I guess I can understand him being cold... but gah. As if we needed more hints that he's not really a nice guy. (Well, of course that gels with the actual story from which he came, but yeah.)

I liked that part, once it was explained. I also liked how the pace of things is really moving.

So it looks like Mina *is* supposed to be in charge officially, which wasn't made clear before. I'll just... be a wimp for the moment and not comment any further on those little conversations. -_- (Feel free though if you want!)

"... my ridiculous female naiveté." At least Quartermain is there to dig her out of that. But with Mina saying those things directly, I'm running out of excuses. Sigh.

At least Quartermain still sounds like Sean Connery in my head.
( 1 Note — Write a Footnote )