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Parasha: Dracula, November 11th reading

I guess I should work on this before Skyrim gets here to distract me! *fidget*


So I wonder what's up with the storm? One of the many powers of the vampire in this novel, meant to distract the men from what happened on board ship, and provide cover for him to escape? To provide power and steering after the captain died?

And I'm assuming of course that the "large dog" was actually a wolf, and actually Dracula. And boxes of earth, indeed. So far I note, no one has even so much as wondered at why someone would ship boxes of dirt across the continent.

Huh, so the SPCA was around and well-known then, too. Well, not too surprising since it was around in the 30s I already knew, due to Herriot's books. Huh, formed in 1824 according to Wiki Pete. Pretty old! Shouldn't it have been the RSPCA over there? Wonder if that's a bit of editing for us dumb 'Mericans.

I notice there seems to be an awful lot of bitterness toward this "New Woman." I guess that would be the feminists starting to rise up, demanding such silly things as more equal treatment, the ability to vote, etc...?

There seems to be an awful lot of coincidence building up in the story so far. Dracula coincidentally happens to arrive just where Harker's fiancee is staying, and coincidentally happens to fasten upon her close friend for his, ah, dining companion, and she just happens to coincidentally suffer from sleepwalking so that it's not so strange when she suddenly ends up in the churchyard in her nightgown, and Mina coincidentally happens to be fastening a pin near her neck to account for any marks there... I mean yeah, some coincidences are probably going to be required for a lot of stories to get off the ground, but come on. :p

And so we add "turning into bats" to the list of powers that Dracula has, like many of the vampires that come after him.But ooo, unlike them... we see the mysterious figure in the daylight!

And something like a good-sized bird... I wonder if that's a bat again, or if he can turn into the shape of, say, a raven or something as well.

Ah, and Lucy seems to be recovering, just as the mysterious boxes of earth are taken away to London. What a mystery! *cough*

Oof, I forgot her full name was "Wilhelmina." No wonder she goes by "Mina."

I'm wondering if Renfield had some connection with Dracula previously, somewhere, somehow, and that was the cause of his madness, or if Dracula just happened across someone whose madness fitted his needs.

And ah, good ol' brain fever. The go-to for anyone needed to be out of commission for a while.

"Arthur says I am getting fat." Gee, how very kind of him! Although I guess that's at least a bit different, said to someone who's been ill and starting to waste away a bit...but I didn't think it had been THAT long.

And... dun dun dun! Enter Van Helsing. M.D., D. Ph., D. Lit., etc etc... sheesh.

And once again we end on a cliffhanger, as Lucy takes yet another turn for the worse...

Comments

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khedron
Nov. 15th, 2011 05:29 pm (UTC)
I notice there seems to be an awful lot of bitterness toward this "New Woman." I guess that would be the feminists starting to rise up, demanding such silly things as more equal treatment, the ability to vote, etc...?

This stood out to me too. I was already starting to wonder how the Lucy's & Mina's letters back & forth were read by you & desdenova (and any other women out there). To *me* they seem pretty reasonable, but I'm a guy, and I already know that reesei and I differ pretty dramatically in how much character (or how realistic a character) we need in our books. What do you think?

Oof, I forgot her full name was "Wilhelmina." No wonder she goes by "Mina."

Not so uncommon! And I knew a "Wilfreda", whose parents really wanted a Fred but found themselves with a daughter. "Mina" is definitely cuter though. Kind of anime.... oh, wait, it means "everyone" in Japanese, huh? Nevermind.

And... dun dun dun! Enter Van Helsing.

Heh! I said "dun dun dun" out-loud myself when he came into the picture. But I like his age, and funny accent, and connection to the story via Seward. Not quite Hugh Jackman, and I'm glad for it.
stormfeather
Nov. 16th, 2011 08:42 pm (UTC)
This stood out to me too. I was already starting to wonder how the Lucy's & Mina's letters back & forth were read by you & desdenova (and any other women out there). To *me* they seem pretty reasonable, but I'm a guy, and I already know that reesei and I differ pretty dramatically in how much character (or how realistic a character) we need in our books. What do you think?


I personally don't think the gibes are too unreasonable, and at least are in character for a woman of the day and age that hadn't yet come to that way of thinking, but they also just seem horribly unenlightened by our own standards. Then again, we still have the friction between the more radical feminists and others, not to mention the childfree versus the, ah, en-kindled? So...
khedron
Nov. 16th, 2011 09:19 pm (UTC)
Oh! Ooops, sorry, I didn't mean how Arthur was picking on her, or the "New Women" stuff, so much as the two female characters in general. I like them, and Mina in particular seems like a very active, involved character -- much more so than I remembered from the movies. I was just wondering what you thought.
stormfeather
Nov. 17th, 2011 07:41 pm (UTC)
I generally like the women, but then again I'm used to the useless, decorative type from reading Austen. ;) Although that's a bit catty, well, in some cases. (Lizzy Bennet for instance is hard to describe like that, some of the other characters though...)
vizsludraugas
Nov. 22nd, 2011 11:12 am (UTC)
Ah, the learned Doctor Van Helsing. Who is a Dutchman, but makes oaths in German, suggesting that he gets called "Dutchman" less for his residence in Amsterdam than for the same reason that vaudeville routines mocking Germans got called "Dutchman acts."
stormfeather
Nov. 22nd, 2011 06:18 pm (UTC)
Either that, or Stoker himself got tangled between "Dutch" and "Deutsch" and started mixing them, although you'd think that less likely for someone actually living in Europe at the time.

But yeah, between his name, and the fact that he's located in Amsterdam, I'd imagine Van Helsing is supposed to be Dutch, not German.
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