?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Page | Next Page

Parasha: February

Yeah, I know, how silly. I'm having the post for February's book a few days after the January post. But I don't want to procrastinate this time! So I realize that most people will still be gone/not commenting on the internets today probably, but hey, it'll be there to comment on as people trickle back in. Besides, it's probably about time to shape up another general list of things to choose from/hash out, so a good head start is good!

Anyhow, some possibilities for February and future months:

Classics (since these seem to fit a lot of tastes, are good for people to catch up on, and are usually at least fairly short):

The Strange Case of Dr. Jeckyl and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson - This one was mentioned briefly in passing before as a suggestion, but hasn't really been roundly discussed. I've read a severely abridged edition as a child, but not the "real thing," so what I know/remember of it seems interesting but any more useful comments are of course welcome.

Dracula by Bram Stoker - Was brought up before as sort of in the same vein (heh) as Frankenstein, I don't think it's either been greatly advocated or argued against, either way.

Mark Twain of some sort - Also brought up briefly in passing, might be interesting because hey, have we done any *American* classics yet?

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell - Which I'm just bringing up now, because it would be a different type of classic than we've done! (And because I happened across my copy while searching for The Wizard of Oz, ahem, which brought it to mind.) Bambi by Felix Salten might be another possibility in the same vein, and interesting for those only having been traumatized by seen the Disney version.

Heidi by Johanna Spyri - I saw various film adaptations of this as a kid, what have you, but it seems to have fallen off my cultural radar! I also found this the other day, and thought it might be interesting. I worry though that translations may or may not differ. I don't know!

(I'd *like* to suggest another Jane Austen book, but that's more from selfish reasons - ie she's one of my favorite authors. :p )

Graphic Novels (since these are also shorter and usually easy to divvy up, and we've done a lot of DC and it'd be good to do something else as well!):

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen - Mentioned before, but which is also a lot in the same lines as what we've done before, and most of it was published by a DC imprint, so I'm suggesting we don't do this right away at least, but maybe consider it still for later.

Astro City - Also mentioned before, this is (or at least originally was) an Image book, instead of DC, and got a lot of acclaim.

Queen and Country - This was also brought up, and is an independent. I haven't read it, but it's by Greg Rucka who I've been impressed with in the past. (Actually I haven't read any of the above, which is sad, but I at least have heard/seen more about them!)

Lucifer - A vague spinoff of Sandman that was quite good, at least to start, but also DC so, see the LoEG comments.

A Marvel book of some sort, since it seems natural to suggest given the amount of DC stuff we've done. I don't know what would be best though - maybe something along the Flagship lines, like an X-Men or Spider-Man GN? Maybe something more acclaimed, like Marvels?

Bone - Which I haven't read much of, but have seen a lot of people loving all over, so I thought I'd at least mention it.

(And hey, there's always Cerebus... I kid, I kid, don't hurt me!)

Other:

Another Agatha Christie novel, since this was mentioned before.

Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones - I brought this up as a possibility because a) it's a great book, b) it's short enough, and c) it'd be interesting to see any discussion between different permutations of people who have seen the movie, read the book, neither, or both.

Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH/Secret of NIMH by Robert C. O'Brien - I mentioned this before for much the same reason as the previous, at least with the movie thing.

An Urban Supernatural book of some flavor, since I mentioned this offhandedly in the last poll I did, and it actually got a few votes, so it seems like there might be some interest.

Good Omens by Gaiman and Pratchett, because dude! It hasn't been mentioned before, but when I thought of it, I thought it'd be possibly a good fit!

I've also been thinking that maybe some children's classics might be interesting to read once in a while, for nostalgia, just as a change of pace, shortness, etc. Nothing very young probably, but maybe something along the lines of Anne of Green Gables or one of the Laura Ingles Wilder books. Or even something younger but loved like The Westing Game or something. Any thoughts on that?

Also, any thoughts on any of the others? I know y'all aren't afraid to give them! :p Or suggest anything else, by all means! Or have I forgotten any other previous suggestions?

Tags:

Comments

( 6 Notes — Write a Footnote )
prodigal
Jan. 2nd, 2011 12:30 am (UTC)
I'd like to suggest Kat Richardson's Greywalker, if not for this month then for some future month's book.
stormfeather
Jan. 5th, 2011 07:09 pm (UTC)
I suppose that will be up to everyone else's interests! I'll make a note of it for future lists though.
(Deleted comment)
stormfeather
Jan. 5th, 2011 07:11 pm (UTC)
I also like Lucifer (man, that just sounds like I should have fundies camped on my lawn, doesn't it?), I'm just hesitant to do Yet Another DC book right now. (I'm also personally leaning toward a regular book for next month since we've been doing graphic novels a bunch lately, but not so much that I'll kick up a fuss if that's what everyone wants.)

I will also point out that the Wizard of Oz (which I shall be procuring shortly) is in fact an American classic....

Oops. I suppose I was casting my mind back to what we've already done, and not really thinking of, y'know, this month!
(Deleted comment)
(Deleted comment)
( 6 Notes — Write a Footnote )