?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Page | Next Page

Damnit damnit damnit, I keep starting on this then forgetting to finish! Sorry this is so late.

Also: Blargh, I really gotta get a poll for Sandman up tonight or at least tomorrow!


Hah. Edward's excess of happiness. Yes, it really shows. And I like (in an admiring the bitchiness sense) the way Lucy just twists that little knife for Elinor.

We get more of an idea here that John Dashwood, while not exactly being a shining example of humanity, has obliviousness as a fault more than active ill-will. Even here, he doesn't pick up on the fact that his wife "isn't home *cough*," and seems to really expect that oh, she'll be thrilled to see his sister. And also really seems to think that he'll be conveying something pleasant when he basically tells Elinor that she's the lesser of two evils.

When the discussion comes around to Colonel Brandon and his presenting the living to Edward, Elinor is almost catty! I'm very nearly proud of her!

And yes, I'm SO SURE that Robert is heartbroken that he couldn't prevent the breech between Edward and his mother from taking place, considering the outcome.

While Charlotte is always silly, I feel really bad for her, having to basically sweep out of her own house in a panic just after she returns to it, because of a silly girl that goes out in bad weather and gets herself sick!

This section also results (or at least helps) probably in my generally liking Mrs. Jennings and Mr. Palmer despite their less-than-shining representations earlier in the book, since Mr. Palmer comes across much better when he's really needed (which is when some fair-weather friends would be showing *less* true sympathy), and Mrs. Jennings just seems to be Elinor's rock here (despite a tendency to look toward the gloomy side).

I also note that when Mrs. Jennings is grieving (a bit early) for Marianne, it's mostly for someone generally so young and beautiful, for her mother, for her sister... but not so much for Marianne as a person. Which is to be expected given how Marianne has acted toward Mrs. Jennings, so it's fitting.

"she entered it - and saw only Willoughby." Wow, how abrupt! Such a large happening in some ways, and so... non-dramatically presented!

And I may say that while Austen seems to think that this story shows Willoughby in a better light, I don't really think it does! I mean, he doesn't have any good reasons for his actions, he's just mercenary and admits to it, and further even admits that he started out his flirtation with Marianne completely cold-heartedly. The one small amelioration I suppose is that he himself didn't actually write the last cold letter to Marianne, but instead it just shows that he's still thoroughly weak through and through. And now that he's made his own bed, he doesn't even want to lie in it without bitching! Not to mention how careless he is of Eliza, and how he still snipes about Colonel Brandon... Grrr.

Notes:

As noted before, the next presentation of a living could be bought and sold like property, perhaps bought for a younger son by a wealthy man, for example. This is what the more mercenary John Dashwood is referring to. It also wouldn't be unknown to have someone hold a living temporarily (as Dashwood expects is done here), while a younger son or some other prospective minister grows to majority and attends the necessary amount of university to be ordained.

"Mr. Palmer, travelling more expeditiously with Colonel Brandon": In other words, the two men would be riding horseback, which was quicker and probably more comfortable given all that I've read about the state of the roads of the day (and the lack of good shock absorption or anything in carriages.) Needless to say this wasn't an option for women, who would be taking the Palmers' carriage.

"The Palmers' apothecary": There were basically three levels of medical professional at the time (aside from midwives and so on), with differing levels of education, tasks, and incomes. I can never remember which was which, but it looks like this site gives a pretty good run-down.


Um, do we really need a link to the schedule? Next time is Friday, to the end of the book!

Comments

( 2 Notes — Write a Footnote )
(Anonymous)
Nov. 25th, 2010 03:13 pm (UTC)
Mrs. Jennings is definitely a good person, even if she doesn't have the best manners. She stands in great contrast to the characters who have good manners, but who are selfish and altogether unlikable (Lady Middleton, Mr. & Mrs. John Dashwood, Willoughby).

wrt Willoughby, I think that his story does paint him in a slightly better light--somewhat less of a cad and more of a dumbass. He's not *good* by any light, and Marianne definitely dodged a bullet when he dumped her. Can you imagine finding out about the situation w/ Brandon's ward after they got married?!

But, I think that Willoughby's confession does something *besides* improving Elinor's (and perhaps the reader's) opinion of his character. That is, it makes Edward look like a much better person, by comparison. After getting disinherited, Willoughby immediately jilts the girl he wanted to marry, and who had every reason to think he was going to propose any day, and gets contracted to some rich chick. On top of that all, both those relationships came after him cutting off his previous flirtation who he had knocked up and ruined for life. Edward, OTOH, stands by his commitment to Lucy. He honorably chooses to fulfill his responsibility to her, despite his later attachment to Miss Dashwood, and getting disinherited on top of that. If Edward were Willoughby, he'd have married Miss Morton in an instant.

(Deleted comment)
( 2 Notes — Write a Footnote )