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Heh, guess the whole "truth is stranger than fiction" idea is even older than one might think, although granted it loses a little punch when the "truth" here is actually fiction...

Holmes just loves all sorts of tobacco products, doesn't he? Combine these with his cocaine habit and generally unhealthy lifestyle...

We also get to see Mary Sutherland, whose name was dropped in the previous story, oddly enough.

I don't actually have as much to say about this one, except that it's not quite as subtle as some of the stories. Maybe a bit straightforward and anticlimactic, when I think about it.

The main thing though is that this is one where Holmes pisses me off at the end. I mean, yeah, it's all well and good that he's ready to smack the guy a few for his horrible treatment of his stepdaughter, and it's nice to (mentally) see him run out the door in fear, but then Holmes just decides to sit back and not even tell his client the truth? WTF, dude?

Not to mention that one would really really like to see karma come around and bite the mother in the ass for this, since the stepfather is bad enough, but the mother, doing this to her own daughter? Blah.


Link to the schedule

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stormfeather
Dec. 8th, 2009 09:34 pm (UTC)
I don't know... it was about a seven percent solution!
khedron
Dec. 9th, 2009 05:51 am (UTC)
Heh, guess the whole "truth is stranger than fiction" idea is even older than one might think, although granted it loses a little punch when the "truth" here is actually fiction...

I did think that was pretty hilarious. I was waiting for "So, you see, Watson, the truth of the Golden Phoenix is far stranger than any story you might hear..."

I was a bit pleased with myself for immediately saying "aha, it's the stepfather" when the gave the description of the man. But really, that doesn't give me much credit. With Holmes describing at every step how ordinary & uninteresting this case is, there weren't too many options available.

Not telling the daughter what was going on was clearly intended to be a nice gesture -- but I think you're right, it backfires, given that she explicitly said she'll wait for him forever. If there was any chance she'd take his (somewhat paternalistic) advice and get on with her life, that'd be different. But in this case, she clearly needs to know more so she can get away from her stepfather and get on with her life.

Of course, these stories are even older than the Asimov ones. I thought I remembered that she was 25 & the stepfather 30, but I can't find any age references anymore, just the delta (5 years). But it was reasonable for a woman to be living on her own with her income at that age, right?

I don't think Holmes gives her enough credit with, "If I told her, she would not believe me." Maybe that's an assessment of ego among other things ("of course, I wouldn't fall in love with my stepfather"), but, well, modern sensibilities demand she get a chance to decide for herself.
crouchback
Dec. 19th, 2009 02:43 pm (UTC)
Yep, modern sensibilities would give her another choice-but Holmes' sensibilities are not modern!

It wasn't unknown for a woman to be living on her own at age 25, but it wasn't something people accepted very well. Even when the woman was someone pining after a lost love.
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