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Book Meme The Second: Answers

Figured I'd go ahead and post the answers, since the original quiz has had the bones picked mostly clean. And I'll probably post another of these with more obscure books in a few days. Because damn, y'all read too much or something.



1. "I see..." said the vampire thoughtfully, and slowly he walked across the room towards the window. For a long time he stood there against the dim light from Divisadero Street and the passing beams of traffic. The boy could see the furnishings of the room more clearly now, the round oak table, the chairs. - Interview With the Vampire, by Anne Rice - pokeypenguin

2. Now consider the tortoise and the eagle. The tortoise is a ground-living creature. It is impossible to live nearer the ground without being under it. - Small Gods, by Terry Pratchett - scifantasy

3. The primroses were over. Toward the edge of the wood, where the ground became open and sloped down to an old fence and a brambly ditch beyond, only a few fading patches of pale yellow still showed among the dog's mercury and the oak-tree roots. On the other side of the fence, the upper part of the field was full of rabbit holes. - Watership Down, by Richard Adams - pokeypenguin

4. Mr Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he was up all night, was seated at the breakfast table. I stood upon the hearth-rug and picked up the stick which our visitor had left behind him the night before. It was a fine, thick piece of wood, bulbous-headed, of the sort which is known as a "Penang lawyer." - The Hound of the Baskervilles, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - Tough call, I'm gonna split credit between scifantasy and mcswan for coming up with the answer almost simultaneously, after previous guesses.

5. The sun sets in the west (just about everyone knows that), but Sunset Towers faced east. Strange! Sunset Towers faced east and had no towers. - The Westing Game, by Ellen Raskin - scifantasy

6. Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the Western Spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-eight million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue-green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea. This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. - The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams - pokeypenguin

7. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters. "My dear Mr. Bennet," said his lady to him one day, "have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?" - Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen - skwidly (scifantasy knew the author, not the title.)

8. "Not feeling any uncomfortable urges, are you?" the low voice in my ear teased. I looked up at the speaker and said, "Huh?" Lamer put a hand on my shoulder and pulled me into her taller, leaner frame. - Resenting the Hero, by Moira J. Moore - the only one guessed by no one

9. (8 April 1817/Rushton Manor, Essex/Dearest Kate,) It is dreadfully flat here since you have been gone, and it only makes it worse to imagine all the things I shall be missing. I wish Aunt Elizabeth were not so set against my having a Season this year. She is still annoyed about the incident with the goat, and says that to let the pair of us loose on London would ruin us both for good, and spoil Georgy's chances into the bargain. - Sorcery & Cecelia (or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot), by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer - jsbowden

10. The palace still shook occasionally as the earth rumbled in memory, groaned as if it would deny what had happened. Bars of sunlight cast through rents in the walls made motes of dust glitter where they yet hung in the air. Scorch-marks marred the walls, the floors, the ceilings. - The Eye of the World, by Robert Jordan - Sorta pokeypenguin, even though he didn't actually give the title :p scifantasy is the first one who actually listed out the title though.

11. "We should start back," Gared urged as the woods began to grow dark around them. "The wildlings are dead." "Do the dead frighten you?" Ser Waymar Royce asked with just the hint of a smile. - A Game of Thrones, by George R. R. Martin - pokeypenguin

12. The unicorn lived in a lilac wood, and she lived all alone. She was very old, although she did not know it, and she was no longer the careless color of sea foam, but rather the color of snow falling on a moonlit night. But her eyes were still clear and unwearied, and she still moved like a shadow on the sea. - The Last Unicorn, by Peter S. Beagle - pokeypenguin

13. This is my favorite book in all the world, though I have never read it. How is such a thing possible? I'll do my best to explain. - The Princess Bride , by William Goldman - dominicflandry, with prince_corwin posting about 3 minutes later.

14. Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide-water dog, strong of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal, and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost. - The Call of the Wild, by Jack London - pokeypenguin

15. Two men appeared out of nowhere, a few yards apart in the narrow, moonlit lane. For a second, they stood quite still, wands directed at each other's chests; then, recognizing each other, they stowed their wands beneat their cloaks and started walking briskly in the same direction. "News? asked the taller of the two." - Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by J. K. Rowling - silmaril, although pokeypenguin and scifantasy were both close.



I guess in a way #8 wasn't very fair because not only is it probably far less read, but the beginning is in no way memorable. But hey, at least I have one that y'all didn't glomp onto immediately, so nyah.

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( 4 Notes — Write a Footnote )
khedron
Jun. 28th, 2008 01:25 am (UTC)
I guess in a way #8 wasn't very fair because not only is it probably far less read, but the beginning is in no way memorable. But hey, at least I have one that y'all didn't glomp onto immediately, so nyah.

We actually just went out and bought this, because of your book meme post! My wife's busily diving into it now. =)
stormfeather
Jun. 28th, 2008 01:44 am (UTC)
Heh, let me know how it goes over. ^^
khedron
Jun. 29th, 2008 06:29 pm (UTC)
She's re-reading it now, so I haven't had a chance to find out. ;-) I'll try to steal it for a plane trip coming up.
reesei
Jun. 29th, 2008 08:26 pm (UTC)
So... Overall, I like it. But...

Pretty much _every_ _single_ _time_ the Source says something that is supposed to be incomprehensible, it's Shakespeare, Milton, Tolkien, Lewis Carroll, or someone else from that Brit Lit survey course, and knowing the context of the original quote makes the entire thing make sense. I really hope that in a future book, they reveal that in the Source Academy they have a hidden copy of a multi-volume set of Old Earth Western Civ classic literature, and that the Sources have been thoroughly trained to express their thoughts in quotations from these books to increase their mystique.

The plot twists required to pull off the ending were... pretty heavy-handed. And unbelievable, unless again they pull out of nowhere a mind-control device that lets the villain successfully manipulate the behavior of individuals and crowds. Or if being around magic just makes people stupid.

On the other hand, I like how she very blatantly sets up the unreliable narrator at the beginning of the book and plays off it throughout. And I _like_ both of the main characters, and want to see them learn to get along. I particularly like Dunleavy bumbling along doing extraordinary thing after extraordinary thing without realizing it, and being completely blindsided over and over by the reactions of other people around her because she's completely incapable of normal human interaction. And doesn't realize it - because after all, Shields are the normal ones.

I assume this is the first book of the author's? It's a good enough early book that I'll be going out to pick up the others to see how she develops over time. It's good clean brain-candy fun, which means I can forgive it the flaws that appear as soon as I expend a few brain cells to think about the plot.
( 4 Notes — Write a Footnote )