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Busy-ness vs. Beauty

Here's an interesting article I found through my 'net trawls, about what happens with one of the world's more prestigious violin virtuosos (virtuosi?) plays incognito, in the middle of the city.

On the one hand I can somewhat understand the viewpoint that people are busy, they're not in their best frame of mind for listening and appreciating beauty and all that but... it's still really damn sad.

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Comments

silmaril
Apr. 12th, 2007 10:14 pm (UTC)
And especially since this was L'Enfant Plaza. I haven't read the article or seen the videos so I don't know where they've parked him, but the only place comfortable near one of the exits of that station is the internal courtyard of the Dept. of Transportation.

And 7:15 am? I feel safe in saying that I might have had a chance of realizing something extraordinary was going on---I always at least glance at street musicians and I always try to give some cash to the ones I listen to for more than one bar, and I know classical music and I have seen photographs of Joshua Bell---but then I would have bled because I could not stay and listen. But, dude, if I am at L'Enfant Plaza at 7:15 am, it's very probably because I can not stand and listen.

I did not read the article, but I read people saying it was a little too snotty in tone (if I recall correctly even the title uses a "pearls before swine" allusion, which, how nice) instead of honestly bewailing how people did not have the chance to appreciate beauty. And 7:15 am at L'Enfant Plaza tells me that the author tried to stack his/her bets that way.
scifantasy
Apr. 12th, 2007 10:27 pm (UTC)
I always at least glance at street musicians and I always try to give some cash to the ones I listen to for more than one bar, and I know classical music and I have seen photographs of Joshua Bell

Giving you probably two more points toward satisfying the test than most people--one for the giving of cash, one for the knowing who the guy is. (Maybe three, for the glancing, but...well, that's complicated.)

Both of which are, of course, aspects of your being a good person; but the lack of those in a person is not evidence against them at all.