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Parasha: Jekyll and Hyde May 19th reading

Everyone's been so quiet! Then again, the chapters and short and I guess there's not so much to discuss?

Anyhow, a very mysteeeeerious opening to this chapter. Oooo!

We also get a bit more of a scientific type of description of how Hyde affects people, which is... weird. But hey.

And the line between Hyde and Jeckyll is fairly blurred, although maybe that's meant to be... I mean, Hyde is very polite to Lanyon, despite his normal character, and shows a lot more self-control than you'd expect from the murderer of Carew. Then again, until we read the last chapter, I can't remember if it was more Jeckyll or Hyde in him at that point, so I guess that might be why?

At any rate, whichever one, or both, that it may have been, it was pretty damn cruel to shock Dr. Lanyon like that. I mean, you'd think that an old friend who owes the doctor for his life/sanity might, y'know, say something like "I will leave you now, but I swear that I will tell you of what is going on tomorrow," or something. But I guess that wouldn't be as dramatic!


Just one more chapter left, so one assumes we don't need a schedule link.

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khedron
May. 24th, 2011 05:15 pm (UTC)
Anyhow, a very mysteeeeerious opening to this chapter. Oooo!

If nothing else, Jeckyll is confirmed as being a *really terrible friend*. My god, the impositions and the drama. I can imagine him writing, "If you are absent from our weekly bowling night.... my heart sinks and my hand trembles at the bare thought of such a possibility!"

We also get a bit more of a scientific type of description of how Hyde affects people, which is... weird. But hey.

I kind of liked the combination of detail and psychological horror. "Something abnormal and misbegotten in the very essence of the creature that now faced me" isn't clinical, but as he says, purely subjective. I'd been used to thinking of sort of "psychological sci-fi" as being the province of the 1970s, as opposed to Asimov or Clarke's hard-sf, but this shows it goes back much farther than that.

Last time, you wrote:

I couldn't remember what had happened to Hyde in the end, I mean, I remember him being dead but I couldn't remember HOW, and I didn't see Utterson and Poole as being the murdering type. But that explains it - he conveniently does away with himself.

I don't see quite why, though. Sure, H.J. predicted it in one of those letters, but I still don't see why it happens. Do you?
stormfeather
May. 25th, 2011 05:09 pm (UTC)
a) Hah, maybe that's part of why I was picturing him as younger.. it's the teen angst thing going on. :p

c) I think we get a bit more reason for it in the last chapter, one of the few things I do remember about reading the "abridged" version as a kidlet, so I guess we can carry that over to tomorrow!
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