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And as one can see by the cut text, here's where Goldman starts playing around with the structure, not to mention starting the major "editings of Morgenstern." *cough cough* And once again he's a bit ironic, shaking his head over Morgenstern putting the brakes on his narrative just when it's getting started, when that's just what Goldman is doing to a lesser extent here.

Then again, it works for Goldman, since he's pretty much pulling us up and saying "this isn't just going to be a love story, I'm also going to be toying with the text and you, the audience, so get used to it."

And we get our first introduction to the Prince, who isn't very... princely. From the physical to the mental descriptions. Although again, that's the point. Anyhow, the less said about him, the better. Which by the length of the chapter was Goldman's thought exactly.

Does anyone else hear (well, read) "marblish" skin and think of varicose veins? Anyone?

And one thing about the book vs. the movie - at least here we get a better idea of why Buttercup agrees to marry the Prince, even if it's still very brief. In the movie, it just seemed like it was something she wanted to do, for whatever reason... but in the book, it's made plain that it's a choice between that, or death. (Humperdink is just such a nice guy.)

And of course lovely chapter four, which is... one page of Goldman's "editing." Which is also an excuse for a time skip of three years.

Anyhow, pretty much all of what we've had so far wasn't in the movie, now that I think about it. Well, maybe a bit of the first chapter, in a very brief form. Which is odd, considering the fact that I tend to think of this as a book/movie pair that remain fairly close to each other.

Anyhow, please, feel free to comment! There's probably plenty here that I've skimmed over.


The schedule

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stormfeather
Jun. 10th, 2010 09:03 pm (UTC)
Hrm... really? I always thought they were pretty similar, but then I guess I can see where the theme emphasis shifts between them (the book being more on the playing-with-Morgenstern bit), but what does actually happen in the movie is pretty much all in the book IIRC, except for the bedtime story reading (which is itself taken kinda from the idea of Goldman's father reading it).

So... it is and it isn't, I guess?

And yes, totally a James Bond villain.
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