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Parasha: Oct. 24 reading (non-spoiler)

Whee, still fidgety from putting in computer order!


Apparently everyone's interested in Jack now, Nightwind, Cheeter, and "a huge, lean wolfish-looking creature."

Snuff tweaks the Vicar's nose a bit with his continued healthy (relatively) existence. Heh.

Talbot plans to rescue Lynette, but not right away, for reasons that make sense (for instance, if the Vicar has too long to re-plan, he might just make use of an innocent random victim).

There is brief discussion of the Jack/Jill, Snuff/Graymalk, Opener/Closer...thing. "'Well, if I may speak freely-'/The clock struck one and I couldn't" *snicker* Poor Snuff.

And suddenly things go pear-shaped with a vengeance, as all the various Things break loose with the assistance of a spell. Jack manages to recapture the Things in the Mirror, into a bottle of Port found by Snuff this time (I wonder if the Things are related to djinns/genies?), but the rest all end up having to be slaughtered by Snuff and cursed-knife-Jack. Which is a bit sad. *sniff* Especially for the poor Thing in the Circle with all its valiant attempts at seducing Snuff with various... ladies.

Some things come to light during the conflict:

1) Jack has the Closing Wand, used as a Game artifact. Plus a "mundane wand" that he's using here. Plus the Knife that made its appearance yesterday, which is apparently the reason for the Curse, and useable in the Game, though not technically one of the actual Game artifacts.

2) We have more evidence of the Victorian era-ness, if we needed it: references to the Strand magazine (which is where Holmes made his debut of course, which starts to get a bit recursive if you think about it), pictures of Dickens and Surtees, Prince Albert (not canned), Tupper and Browning. (The former lying atop the latter, "their covers torn," which I wonder if it were meant to sound a bit dirty like my gutter mind made it.)

3) We also find out the reason for the keeping of the Things - they were to be used for a retreat at the end of the Game if necessary. Now, previously it was mentioned that the losers die in a backlash of power - I'm not sure if this means that a guarded Retreat is expected to be necessary even for the victors for some reason, or if the dying of the backlash thing isn't set in stone and it's a last-ditch contingency for if they lose and survive.

4) The release of Things was part of a magical attack, presumably from the Vicar.

5) While Jack apparently isn't a diviner (or Snuff wouldn't be considering bringing in an outside one to find hidden Players), he has enough raw magical ability and the know-how to stop a magical onslaught and clean up the effects. Which I guess makes sense for someone in a magical Game, so to speak, but it still struck me as noteworthy for some reason.

At the end of it all, Jill and Graymalk show up, to see what was going on, since the place had been basically masked in pitch blackness. Jack refers to the Things as "dismembered ogres," but I'm suspecting that's just a figurative thing than a literal description of them as ogres.

"Ah, the old crystal bell effect. Haven't seen that one since Alexandria." Again, not sure if it's an actual capital-letter Reference, or just something thrown in for giggles.

Also, Jack says he doesn't go in for the whole "warnings" thing, but basically gives anyone two strikes, and the third one, they are out, permanently.

Snuff "nodded vigorously" when Jack mentioned that it was far to the river, re: the corpses. Heh. Poor Snuff. Again.

With Snuff's help, the foursome decide to put the bodies into some of Owen's wicker baskets and light them up. Poor Owen. Wonder what the baskets were intended for exactly.

And at the end, Snuff quotes a poem, which adds a new wrinkle, because said poem wasn't apparently written (according to wikipedia) until 1920. Well, published then, and since the poetess wasn't born until 1892, it definitely couldn't have been written by the time this is in theory supposed to take place.

Bah!

And I'm assuming that the reference to "hickory dickory dock" at the very very end, after that, is because the clock struck one, and Snuff could no longer speak again, rounding it out with the start of the chapter.

Comments

( 8 Notes — Write a Footnote )
khedron
Oct. 24th, 2009 08:07 pm (UTC)
Gutter-minded #2: Yep, me too.

Poem: Interesting! That's ... huh, I'm not sure what that is. Does anyone know when "The Wolf Man" was supposed to take place? I ask because, apart from Larry Talbot, it all seems vaguely period-reasonable to me.


I got a couple of *snerks* out of the bottle. "Passing a corked bottle of port and spirits", etc.
stormfeather
Oct. 24th, 2009 08:12 pm (UTC)
I got a couple of *snerks* out of the bottle. "Passing a corked bottle of port and spirits", etc.

Hah, yes, and having to offer sherry instead of port because the port has "gone bad."
jsbowden
Oct. 24th, 2009 09:27 pm (UTC)
Now, previously it was mentioned that the losers die in a backlash of power

I've seen this more than once, and I'd just like to point out, for the record, that while death is the most likely consequence for failure, it's never made explicit that it's a definite outcome.
(Deleted comment)
stormfeather
Oct. 25th, 2009 04:34 am (UTC)
Well, it's stated, but we don't necessarily know if it's a "this happens 100% of the time, no exceptions" or just a generalization.
(Deleted comment)
kpmooney
Oct. 25th, 2009 08:29 am (UTC)
Yeah, plus Snuff mentions at one point that revealing that he had played before was the same as revealing he was a Closer.
stormfeather
Oct. 25th, 2009 07:53 pm (UTC)
If you're referencing the same thing I'm thinking of, he just mentions that he's revealing *something* in admitting that, but it could just be the fact that he's not a (relatively) normal, mortal dog. Since if the Games take place decades apart at best...
( 8 Notes — Write a Footnote )